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Posts Tagged ‘natural’

Dairy Goddess Is At It Again! What's Cookin'? Vanilla Milk, New Cheeses, AND A Grandbaby!

I can not believe it has been since November that I have last posted. I ask it often and asking again, “Where does the time go?” I guess we know the answer…it is from being busy. That is a good thing.
My daughter’s wedding was such a wonderful life event. I felt it could not get better than that, but, well it did when they told Tony and I that we are going to be GRANDPARENTS! We are thrilled and live and pray daily to meet this lil’ guy OR gal. (I can’t wait till they find out)!

Don’t think we have been lolli-gaggin’ though…we have been busy as bees! We are just introducing three more cheeses that we are very proud of. Our Mexi-Mozzarella, Goddess Feta and a dreamy Teleme.

We are also just testing out our Vanilla Milk! It is AMAZING and can’t wait to make it available to the masses! It’s ALL natural. No food coloring. Only Whole Milk, Vanilla and Pure Cane Sugar. Perfect for cereal and coffee. I love it cold and straight from the bottle.

I have missed my blogging very much.  I miss writing and sharing. I am better with my Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/dairygoddesscheese . That is not to say that I don’t LOVE  blogging but often those things you love the most get a little neglected so I promise to try to work on that.

I love my lil’ Godd-ett’s!

As always if you have any questions, please let me know. I am happy to answer them!

Love Always, Your Dairy Goddess

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Non-Homogenized Lightly Pasteurized "Cream Top" Milk Nectar From Our Dairy

Non-Homogenized Lightly Pasteurized “Cream Top” Milk
Nectar From Our Dairy

I drink whole milk and eat full-fat yogurt, cream cheese, and sour cream. Sure, full-fat dairy products taste better than the skim/fat-free versions, but I don’t eat them for the taste. I eat full-fat dairy because it’s better for my health and my weight.

Yep, you heard me right: I eat dairy products with all the fat god gave ‘em, and I do it because it’s good for me.

Here’s why:

1. Our bodies cannot digest the protein or absorb the calcium from milk without the fat.

2. Vitamins A and D are also fat-soluble. So you can’t absorb them from milk when all the fat has been skimmed off. (This makes fortified skim milk the biggest sham of all — you can pump fat-free milk full of a year’s supply of vitamins A and D, but the body can’t access them).

3. Milk fat contains glycosphingolipids, types of fats linked to immune system health and cell metabolism.

4. Contrary to popular belief, low-fat and fat-free diets do not help prevent heart disease, and science has now revealed that the link between saturated fat (long villainized as a cause of heart disease) and heart disease is tenuous at best.

5. In fact, studies now show that eating saturated fat raises good cholesterol — the kind of cholesterol you want and need in your body.

6. The world’s healthiest foods are whole foods — foods that have not been processed. Why? The nutrients in whole foods have a natural synergy with one another — that is, they work best in and are most beneficial to the body when they are taken together (not when they are isolated in, say, beta-carotene supplements of Vitamin C capsules). So when you pull some or all of the fat out of milk, you throw its nutritional profile out of whack. Basically, you discard all of the health benefits when you discard the fat.

7. And last but definitely not least: healthy dietary fat will NOT make you fat. We’ve been taught for years that dietary fat is the root of all evil. But we need healthy fat in our diet for proper body composition and long-term weight maintenance. The key factor here is knowing the difference between good fats and bad fats (for more on good and bad fats and the role healthy fat plays in weight maintenance..

A final note: When it comes to whole milk, you should also drink nonhomogenized when you can. Homogenization is “the technique of crushing milkfat globules into droplets too small to rise to the surface in a cream layer,” writes Anne Mendelson in Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages (Knopf, 2008). Homogenization offered two big advantages to the dairy industry: (1) the abolition of the “creamline,” as it’s called, made it possible to package milk in more convenient [read: disposable] cardboard packaging instead of traditional glass bottles and (2) homogenizing made it possible for a commercial dairy to “calculate the amount of fat in incoming milk, completely remove it, and homogenize it back into milk in any desired proportion…In effect, ‘whole milk’ could now be whatever the industry said it was.”

To put it more bluntly: homogenized whole milk isn’t whole. The dairy-processing industry decided that whole milk should be milk with 3.25% fat (raw milk straight from the cow averages between 4 – 5.5% fat). That way, no matter what cow produced the milk, after homogenization all the milk would taste the same.

When you buy homogenized milk, you’re buying a whole food that isn’t whole — it’s had it’s fat removed, evened out, and injected back into it in an amount less than what appears in nature. So choose whole milk, skip homogenization, and enjoy!
By Laine Bergeson, Experience Life

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